Firing My Lawyer

Back in September, I told my lawyer that we were going to challenge my prior conviction and certain other damaging information, so as to minimize my likely sentence. At first, she claimed that she could not do it. I did the research and proved her wrong. She then agreed to do as I asked — and has done so.

What she has not done is the preparation to make the challenge a successful one. She said she would do so but, in late January, I made her admit that she had failed to do various critical tasks. She then said that she would get them in process before she left for her maternity leave. A month into that, I discovered that nothing was in process and that her boss was against doing the necessary. I have already had dealings with her boss. He’s an “I’m a lawyer, you’re not, so shut the fuck up” sort of guy, so I’m not going to fight them on this. I’m going to the judge to ask for a new lawyer.

I’ve had six appointed lawyers. All but one of them screwed up big time — and that one lawyer hasn’t done anything yet, allegedly because she’s waiting for transcripts. (Four months so far….) Two of these lawyers willfully screwed me over. One of them was simply incompetent. I’m still trying to figure out what’s with my soon-to-be-ex lawyer: Are her failures her own or her boss’s? (The last lawyer was likely minor incompetence.)

Welcome to the American criminal “justice” system….

Innocence Doesn’t Matter

This is not a diatribe against the legal system’s disdain for the question of its victims’ innocence. Not that I couldn’t write such a diatribe. I’d start with Herrera v. Collins, which decided that it was OK for a government to murder a convict even if there was solid evidence of that person’s innocence. This is, instead, an explanation of what might seem to some a curious omission.

I did not claim my innocence in the posts about my prosecution. I merely discussed why my prosecution was a travesty. I’ve been working on another post in which I will discuss the evidence that my prosecution was based on but, again, I won’t claim my innocence.

Justice is not merely a matter of punishing those who happen to be guilty, it is a process of determining guilt or innocence by applying principles of reasoning to facts. When a government obtains a conviction by violating its own rules, or the rules of reason and morality, that conviction is wrong even if the accused is in fact guilty.

That said, I will use this opportunity to say: I did not sexually assault the alleged victim.

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Who Is the Criminal, the Convict or the Government?

I recently read an article in the online USA Today, Scores in N.C. are legally ‘innocent,’ yet still imprisoned, which should give anyone pause. Here’s what it says:

There is a federal law that says that a felon may not possess a gun. The federal government thought that certain North Carolina crimes were felonies. They imprisoned a bunch of people who had committed those crimes and were later found with a gun. Now they realize that those crimes were not felonies and that these people are not guilty of the crime they are in prison for. Instead of trying to get these people out of prison, the federal government is doing its best to keep them in prison.

I could say a few things about this. However, it’s already been said by, among others, the Supreme Court and the authors of the Constitution:

Berger v United States, 295 U.S. 78, 88 (1935):

The United States Attorney is the representative not of an ordinary party to a controversy, but of a sovereignty whose obligation to govern impartially is as compelling as its obligation to govern at all, and whose interest, therefore, in a criminal prosecution is not that it shall win a case, but that justice shall be done. As such, he is in a peculiar and very definite sense the servant of the law, the two-fold aim of which is that guilt shall not escape or innocence suffer. He may prosecute with earnestness and vigor — indeed, he should do so. But, while he may strike hard blows, he is not at liberty to strike foul ones. It is as much his duty to refrain from improper methods calculated to produce a wrongful conviction as it is to use every legitimate means to bring about a just one.

Imbler v. Pachtman, 424 U.S. 409, 427n25 (1976)

The possibility of personal iiability also could dampen the prosecutor’s exercise of his duty to bring to the attention of the court or of proper officials all significant evidence suggestive of innocence or mitigation. At trial, this duty is enforced by the requirements of due process, but, after a conviction, the prosecutor also is bound by the ethics of his office to inform the appropriate authority of after-acquired or other information that casts doubt upon the correctness of the conviction. Cf. ABA Code of Professional Responsibility EC 7-13 (1969); ABA, Standards, supra, 3.11.

Bordenkircher v. Hayes, 434 U.S. 357, 363 (1978)

To punish a person because he has done what the law plainly allows him to do is a due process violation of the most basic sort….

Constitution of the United States of America, Amendment V

No person shall … be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law….